Winner Resident/Fellow Research Competition Paradise Island, Bahamas

Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Society         

April, 2013

 

AAOS/POSNA Resident Scholarship      

Orlando, Florida

9th International Pediatric Orthopaedic Symposium            

December, 2012

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Rosemont, IL

Member   

 

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons  Rosemont, IL

 Member             

 

Horry County Medical Society

 Member

OITE PGY-1:           99th percentile 

OITE PGY-2:           100th percentile 

OITE PGY-3:           99th percentile 

OITE PGY-4:          100th percentile        

OITE PGY-5:          100th percentile        

ABOS Part 1:          98th percentile

ABOS Part 2:          Board Certified

Recent Interview in GrandStrand Magazine

Education

Pennsylvania State University  

Bachelor of Science with Distinction

Major in Pre Medicine

Jefferson Medical College 

Doctor of Medicine   

Magna Cum Laude

Geisinger Health System

Orthopedic Surgery Residency

Danville, PA

University of Utah 

Adult Reconstruction Fellowship 

Salt Lake City, UT

Dr. Brothers is a board certified and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon. He is a graduate of Jefferson Medical College. He completed residency in orthopaedic surgery at Geisinger Health Systems and then pursued additional training in adult reconstruction during his fellowship at the University of Utah. He specializes in adult reconstructive surgery of the hip and knee. This includes direct anterior total hip replacement, total and partial knee replacement as well as revision hip and knee replacements. He is also a proud husband and father of two young children.

Dr. Justin Brothers

How long have you been in Myrtle Beach and why practice here?


-   I moved to Myrtle Beach in 2016 to start my practice with Strand Orthopaedic Consultants.  I chose to practice in Myrtle Beach for several reasons. I have family nearby in eastern North Carolina and spent a lot of time in this area growing up. I can’t wait to share all the experiences I enjoyed as a child with my family.  I love the sense of unity and the friendly, welcoming nature of the community. Of course, I also enjoy golfing, fishing and all the outdoor amenities Myrtle Beach has to offer. Professionally, as the community grows and the population ages, there has become a need for high quality joint replacement and orthopaedic care that I can provide.

Briefly describe your practice.


-    In addition to a general orthopaedic residency, I completed an additional year of subspecialty training in adult reconstruction or hip and knee replacement. My practice focuses on the treatment of adult hip and knee arthritis.   I perform total hip replacement through a direct anterior, muscle sparing approach. This helps speed recovery and reduces complications such as dislocation.  I also perform total and partial knee replacements for treatment of knee arthritis.  I also have extensive training in evaluating and revising previous failed or painful total hip and knee replacements.

Why did you pursue medicine and your specialty?


-    I chose to pursue medicine for the same reason as a lot of physicians. It is mentally challenging and requires dedication but also gives you the ability to help people when they need it most. Orthopaedic surgery, specifically, is an incredibly rewarding profession.  People come to me having suffered for years with hip and knee pain and I have the opportunity to cure them of that suffering.  It is also a very mechanical and hands on specialty. The difference between an excellent knee replacement and an average one is measured in millimeters. I enjoy the challenge of obtaining a perfect result every time.

What is rewarding about what you do?


-    Orthopaedic surgeons like to identify an acute problem with your bones or muscles and go and fix it. Whether it’s a broken bone or severe hip arthritis; fixing that problem alone can be challenging and very satisfying. More importantly, however, I have the ability with an hour-long surgery to reverse years of pain and disability. I love seeing my patients walk into my clinic better than they have in years. It’s a great feeling to be able to give people their lives back.

Why should a patient visit your practice?


-    A patient should visit my practice if they have severe hip or knee pain. If they are unsure of their diagnosis I have multiple tools at my disposal to determine the cause. If they have been told that they have arthritis or need a hip or knee replacement I am happy to help. 


-    You should visit my practice if you are interested in having a Direct Anterior Approach for total hip replacement. If you are interested in partial or total knee replacement. If you have pain from a failed total knee or hip replacement. Although the first surgery is your best chance for an excellent result, often I can identify a source of the problem and address it.

What do you want patients/public to know about you and/or your philosophy?


-    I believe in treating the patient as a whole. It is easy to get focused on the problem alone and forget about the person. Each patient has different needs and different goals and I believe tailoring my care to each patient produces better results.


-    I believe in exhausting conservative management. Although hip and knee replacements are fantastic surgeries and I love to operate, surgery works best when all other treatments have failed.  


-    I believe in accelerated recovery. Years ago patients spent a week in the hospital after a knee or hip replacement. With improved techniques such as minimally invasive approaches and multimodal pain management we’ve reduce that need to a day or two at most. We’ve found that getting the patient out of bed and walking the day of surgery and getting them home as soon as possible helps minimize complications and speed recovery.

 

Have you made any changes in the past year that our readers should know about?


-    This is an interesting question. Hip and knee replacement is improving every year and I go to conferences to stay on the cutting edge. Our biggest changes recently have been in pain management, techniques to minimize blood loss and speed recovery.  


-    At the same time, I would caution patients from jumping into new technology before it has been tested thoroughly.  We simply don’t know how long a new implant will last when it just becomes available. Although I have adopted many of these changes, all my practices are supported by years of evidence.

What are some of the latest advancements in your field? 


-    The direct anterior approach for total hip replacement has been one of the biggest advancements in my field. This approach allows me to work around muscles instead of through them. This speeds early recovery. It also preserves structures that are crucial to hip stability to minimize the risk of dislocation.  Perhaps most importantly, it facilitates precise positioning of the implants. I have the ability to put the parts exactly where I want without any guesswork.


-    Partial knee replacement has been around for years but there have been advances in minimally invasive techniques. We know that partial knee replacements recover much faster and feel more normal than a total knee replacement. 


-    Related to both of these are improvements in pain control and recovery. Using multiple medications and minimally invasive techniques almost all patients can go home the day after surgery and many the day of surgery.   We can reduce complications by getting healthy patients out of the hospital setting and allow them to recover in the comfort of their own homes earlier.

What do you believe sets you apart from others in your field?


-    The biggest thing that sets me apart is my fellowship training in adult reconstruction. Regardless of what you need, I believe it’s wise to go to a person who subspecializes and does a lot of that particular thing.  I specialize in hip and knee replacements and have had the fortune of doing over 500 this past year.  I stay up to date on orthopaedic research to minimize complications and speed recovery. I’m comfortable with direct anterior total hip replacement and partial knee replacement. Finally, I’m comfortable taking care of complex problems. I enjoy taking on tough cases from which others may shy away.
 

Marital status, family, what do you like to do in your free time?


-    I’m married with a 4 year old son and 1 year old daughter. My favorite thing to do is spend time with my family outside. We do a lot of hiking and love spending time at the beach or in the ocean. I also enjoy fishing, golf, tennis and college athletics. 
 

Examinations

Professional Memberships

Honors and Awards

Publications

  • Christensen JC, Brothers JG, Stoddard GJ, Anderson MB, Pelt CE, Gililland JM, Peters CL. Higher Frequency of Reoperation With a New Bicurciate-retianing Total Knee Arthroplasty. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2016 Apr 4. [Epub ahead of print]

 

  • Speeckaert AL, Brothers JG, Wingert N, Klena JC.  Airborne Exposure of Methyl Methacrylate During Simulated Total Hip Arthroplasty and Fabrication of Antibiotic Beads. JOA August 2015

 

  • Beck JD, Brothers JG, Maloney PJ, Tang X, Deegan HS, Klena JC. Predicting the Outcome of Revision Carpal Tunnel Release. J Hand Surg; 2012:37A 282-287.

 

  • Retrespo C, Mortazavi SJ, Brothers JG, Parvizi J, Rothman RH. Hip Dislocation: Are Hip Precautions Necessary in Anterior Approaches? Clin Orthop Relat Res (2011) 469:417-422.

 

  • White AP, Brothers JG, Brown ZB, Vaccaro AR. Techniques to maximize the safety of bone morphogenic proteins in cervical spine surgery. Minerva Ortop. 2007 Jun;58: 271-278.

Book Chapters

  • Brothers JG, Peters CL. Ch. 13. Bicruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty. Orthopaedic Knowledge Update: Hip and Knee Reconstruction 5.  Eds. Mont MA, Tanzer M.

  • Cashman J, Brothers JG, Parvizi J. Ch. 11 Minimizing Complications. Fundamentals of Revision Hip Arthroplasty: Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment. Eds. Jacofsky DJ, Hedley AK. Slack Inc. 2012

  • White AP, Brothers JG, Vaccaro AR. Review of the medical evidence regarding the surgical treatment of low back pain. Surgery for Low Back Pain. Eds. Szpalski M, Gunzburg R, Rydevik B. Springer-Verlag New York, LLC. In press, 2010.

  • McCall T, Brothers JG, Fasset DR, Vaccaro AR. Surgical complications related to the management of traumatic spinal injuries of the cervical spine. Pediatric and Adult Spine Trauma. Eds. Daniel H. Kim, Steven C. Ludwig, and Alexander R. Vaccaro. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Elsevier Inc., Health Sciences. In press, 2007.

Podium Presentations

  • Brothers JG, Peters CL. Ch. 13. Bicruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty. Orthopaedic Knowledge Update: Hip and Knee Reconstruction 5.  Eds. Mont MA, Tanzer M.

  • Cashman J, Brothers JG, Parvizi J. Ch. 11 Minimizing Complications. Fundamentals of Revision Hip Arthroplasty: Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment. Eds. Jacofsky DJ, Hedley AK. Slack Inc. 2012

  • White AP, Brothers JG, Vaccaro AR. Review of the medical evidence regarding the surgical treatment of low back pain. Surgery for Low Back Pain. Eds. Szpalski M, Gunzburg R, Rydevik B. Springer-Verlag New York, LLC. In press, 2010.

  • McCall T, Brothers JG, Fasset DR, Vaccaro AR. Surgical complications related to the management of traumatic spinal injuries of the cervical spine. Pediatric and Adult Spine Trauma. Eds. Daniel H. Kim, Steven C. Ludwig, and Alexander R. Vaccaro. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Elsevier Inc., Health Sciences. In press, 2007.

Poster Presentations

  • Richard R, Irgit K, Brothers JG, Horwitz DH. Outcomes of High and Low Energy Operatively Plated Midshaft Clavicle Fractures (AO/OTA 15-B). Orthopaedic Trauma Association Annual Meeting. Tampa, FL Oct 15-18 2014

  • Speeckaert AL, Brothers JG, Wingert N, Klena JC.  Airborne Exposure of Methyl Methacrylate During Simulated Total Hip Arthroplasty and Fabrication of Antibiotic Beads. EFORT Annual Congress. London UK. June 4-6, 2014.

  • Speeckaert AL, Brothers JG,  Klena, JC. Clinical Outcomes of Scaphoid Excision Four Corner Fusions with a Circular PEEK plate. AAHS Annual Meeting. Kauai, Hawaii. January 8-11, 2014.

  • Brothers JG, Irgit K, Deegan B, Richard R, Widmaier JC, Horwitz DS. Open Reduction Internal Fixation and Acute Total Hip Arthroplasty for Complex Acetabular Fractures. Western Orthopaedic Association Annual Meeting. Lake Tahoe, CA. July 31 – August 3, 2013

  • Klena JC, Riehl JT, Beck JD, Brothers JG. Anomalous Extensor Tendons to the Long Finger: A Cadaveric Study of Incidence.  POS Summer Meeting. Miami FL. April 20-21, 2012.

  • Beck JD, Maloney PJ, Brothers JG, Deegan HS, Klena JC. Predicting the Outcome of Revision Carpal Tunnel Release. ASSH Annual National Meeting. Las Vegas CA. September 8 - 10, 2011.

  • Brothers JG, Greenky M Austin MS. Infection in revision total joint arthroplasty (TJA): The role of nutrition screening. AAOS Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA. February 15-19, 2011.

  • Sharkey PF, Restrepo C, Mortazavi SMJ, Brothers J, Parvizi J, Rothman RH. Hip Dislocation: Are Hip Precautions Necessary? Hip Society Members Meeting, Palo Alto CA. September 24 - 26, 2009.